Book Review: Indigo’s Dragon (Sofi Croft)

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Accent Press

Pages: 90

Release Date: June 23rd 2016

Summary (from Goodreads):

Some families keep monstrous secrets…

Indigo lives in the Lake District, and spends his time exploring the mountains he loves. An unexpected parcel arrives containing a first aid kit inside his grandfather’s satchel. Indigo’s curiosity is raised as he looks through his grandfather’s notebook to discover drawings of mythical creatures.

Strange things begin to happen and Indigo finds himself treating an injured magpie-cat, curing a cockatrice of its death-darting gaze, and defending a dragon. Indigo realises he must uncover the secrets his family have kept hidden, and travels alone to the Polish mountains to search for his grandfather and the truth.

Danger looms as events spiral out of control, and Indigo needs to make choices that change him, his world, and his future forever…

Review:

I’ve started reading a little more MG books lately – it’s always good to try something new, and I’m definitely glad I did with this one.

Indigo’s Dragon is a quick and exciting fantasy novel set in the rolling hills of the Lake District and the beautiful Polish mountains. I felt the settings played a huge part within the story and the descriptions really brought it to life: it’s not too description heavy, which is better for younger readers, but there’s enough there so that you can really visualise it and get a good sense of the wonderful surroundings.

There’s plenty of mystery within the book and it gets stuck into it straight away: it certainly grabbed my attention and I think younger readers will have no problem with staying engaged. The plot moves quickly without feeling rushed, and you never quite know where it’s going – I definitely didn’t see the ending coming, and it’s really made me look forward to the sequel, which I think will be a different book from what I was expecting.

I loved the creatures in the book the most – they could easily have been standard monsters, but Croft adds in little details that makes you see them as animals instead, with their own habitats and habits and quirks.

Indigo is a great protagonist and someone I feel readers will relate to. He’s smart, but not overly clever, and he has his flaws too, which make him feel human and real. I love the debate that goes on between him and Orava on the effect of the creatures living near to humans – dragons and cockatrices can be disruptive and deadly to humans, so it’s hard to get the balance between preserving the creatures and looking after your own needs.

This is a book I can really imagine reading aloud to my children one day, or having them read it aloud to me as they grow more confident with reading. For fans of Harry Potter and How to Train Your Dragon, this book is sure to be a hit with younger readers, and I look forward to the sequel!

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