Book Review: The Loneliest Girl in the Universe (Lauren James)

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Walker Books

Pages: 290

Release Date: September 7th 2017

Summary (from Goodreads):

Can you fall in love with someone you’ve never met, never even spoken to – someone who is light years away?

Romy Silvers is the only surviving crew-member of a spaceship travelling to a new planet, on a mission to establish a second home for humanity amongst the stars. Alone in space, she is the loneliest girl in the universe until she hears about a new ship which has launched from Earth – with a single passenger on board. A boy called J.

Their only communication with each other is via email – and due to the distance between them, their messages take months to transmit across space. And yet Romy finds herself falling in love.

But what does Romy really know about J? And what do the mysterious messages which have started arriving from Earth really mean?

Sometimes, there’s something worse than being alone . . .

Continue reading “Book Review: The Loneliest Girl in the Universe (Lauren James)”

Book Review: The Fallen Children (David Owen)

Publisher: Atom

Pages: 240

Release Date: May 4th 2017

Summary (from Goodreads):

Young people on the Midwich Estate don’t have much hope for their futures. Keisha has lived there her whole life, and has been working hard to escape it; others have just accepted their lot.

But change is coming…

One night everyone inside Midwich Tower falls mysteriously unconscious in one inexplicable ‘Nightout’. No one can explain what happened during those lost hours, but soon afterwards Keisha and three other girls find they’re pregnant – and the babies are growing at an alarming rate.

As the news spreads around the tower its residents turn against them and the situation spirals toward violence. Keisha’s life unravels as she realises that the pregnancy may not have just ruined her hopes for the future: she might be mother to the end of the world.

Review:

I haven’t bought many books lately (I have such a backlog to get through as it is) but whenever I heard about this one on Twitter I knew I had to get it.

I didn’t realise where it took its inspiration from (The Cuckoos of Midwich/The Village of the Damned) until my partner watched the latter and told me I should write a book telling the story from the women’s point of view. The next day I went out and bought The Fallen Children and realised David Owen had already beaten me to it – and done a hell of a job.

I really love the idea of updating this story to make it reflect challenges young people face today. There’s an introduction by the author that had me loving the book before I even started it. I don’t really fall into the young person/16-25 category anymore but I am part of the millennial generation and we do get a bad rep. I’m sick of being told we don’t work hard enough or it’s our fault we can’t buy houses because we buy too many avocados, and any of the other ridiculous things that come up.

Rant over, on to the book.

We see the story from several points of view: Keisha, Morris and Siobhan in the first half, and Keisha, Morris and Maida in the second. It was interesting to see the different ways they all reacted to the unexpected pregnancies, especially the girls. While Keisha and Siobhan feel violated over what happened to them and how they’ve lost control of their lives, Olivia is torn because she always wanted a child and Maida feels she is part of something special. I think I’m more on Keisha and Siobhan’s side, but it was good to get a different perspective on things.

Morris, on the other hand, takes it all in his stride, after the initial shock. I found it odd how much he wanted to play happy families and ignore how and where these babies came from. His character frustrated me so much: sometimes he was so sweet and I knew he was trying hard to do what’s best, and other times his actions made me want to scream at him. I found Maida’s story one of the most interesting, especially after the children are born. She’s the one who really appreciates their powers, loves them and believes they’re special.

While I appreciated the message, I thought it was delivered a little heavy handedly sometimes, with a lot of speeches and ‘moments’ towards the end. But it does make you think about the expectations put on you, and that you put on others. I loved the diverse range of characters and felt it really reflected, in a positive way, a part of society that is often looked down upon. The sci-fi element of the book is tense and keeps you reading but it’s the reflections on real life that really hit home.

I loved this book and I hope you’ll read it and love it too. As an added piece of awesomeness, it’s available in over 360 different colours and they’re all beautiful.

4

Book Review: The Last Beginning (Lauren James)

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Walker Books

Pages: 352

Release Date: October 6th 2016

Summary (from Goodreads):

Sixteen years ago, after a scandal that rocked the world, teenagers Katherine and Matthew vanished without a trace. Now Clove Sutcliffe is determined to find her long lost relatives. But where do you start looking for a couple who seem to have been reincarnated at every key moment in history? Who were Kate and Matt? Why were they born again and again? And who is the mysterious Ella, who keeps appearing at every turn in Clove’s investigation?

For Clove, there is a mystery to solve in the past and a love to find in the future.

Review:

I was super excited to receive a review copy of this book, and then with everything going on the last month or so it got a bit forgotten. So sorry to the lovely people at Walker books for that! I’m glad I’ve got round to reading it though because it was really fab.

I really enjoyed The Next Together but somehow this book just did it more for me. While I sometimes found Kate irritating as a protagonist, I really loved Clove. She had some of Kate’s impulsiveness and some of Matthew’s thoughtfulness and a whole load more personality of her own. I loved that she knitted to relax/let off some steam, although it used to have the opposite effect on me!

It was great to read about a gay character in a time travel book, where the focus isn’t on being gay/coming out. Clove and Ella’s relationship was sweet: confusing and frustrating at times maybe, but what relationship isn’t?! It took a while to get my head round some bits of it but that’s time travel for you. Special shout out again to James’ version of the future and the little ways she drops things in about it: it’s all subtle and works perfectly to build a picture of the world you’re in.

It was great to have some of the mysteries of the first book resolved and finally learn why Kate and Matt keep coming together at different points in history. It wasn’t the answer I was expecting either. Some bits of the plot had a ring of familiarity to them – changing things in the past and then actions making you start to disappear in the future, etc – but it was all well written and enjoyable so I’m not complaining. There were also parts that made me want to read The Next Together again, real ‘OMG that’s clever’ moments. You can tell the books were really well planned out.

This was a fab ending to the duology, although if she wanted to add another book in with more of Clove’s adventures, I wouldn’t be complaining. It’s probably not going to happen so I’ll just have to wait for her next book, The Loneliest Girl in the Universe, which sounds awesome just from the title alone!

4

Book Review: The Next Together (Lauren James)

Publisher: Walker

Pages: 356

Release Date: September 3rd 2015

Summary (from Goodreads):

How many times can you lose the person you love?

Katherine and Matthew are destined to be born again and again, century after century. Each time, their presence changes history for the better, and each time, they fall hopelessly in love, only to be tragically separated.

Spanning the Crimean War, the Siege of Carlisle and the near-future of 2019 and 2039 they find themselves sacrificing their lives to save the world. But why do they keep coming back? What else must they achieve before they can be left to live and love in peace?

Maybe the next together will be different…

Review:

This is a book that I have been meaning to get on for ages and I’m a bit embarrassed that it’s taken me this long. But, hey ho, I’ve read it now, and just in time as I have a beautiful copy of The Last Beginning sat on my shelf too.

The Next Together follows the story of Katherine and Matthew across four different timelines. They meet, they fall in lover, they’re torn apart, and then they come back to do it all over again. Why do they keep coming back, and is there a way to stop the cycle?

The book flits between the characters in their different eras with ease: I never felt confused as to where we were, and I didn’t really dislike one either. I often find with multiple view points/stories you end up groaning when you realise the one you don’t like is up next, but I enjoyed all of these. I liked 2039 the best, and felt it really showed the way the future had changed well in little subtle ways.

Katherine and Matthew were great characters across all their incarnations. I think I liked all the different Matthews but Katherine did occasionally get on my nerves: I didn’t think she was as funny as she thought she was and I’m not sure we’d get on in real life!

The great mystery of the book was why they kept coming back together, and when I was none the wiser near the end I realised I might have to wait until book 2 for a full explanation. There’s enough to keep me satisfied for now though. The bits I found most interesting were the comments in between sections, where notes were made on whether the relationship was on track or if the ‘objective’ would be achieved. I found this really intriguing, and the repeatedly denied request for interference was really frustrating and I was really happy when it finally happened.

This book was a fun mix of genres and I felt it had a bit for everyone: romance, historical, sci-fi and contemporary. Each era was well researched and felt natural, and after the action packed ending I’m really excited to read the sequel.

4

Book Review: Revenger (Alastair Reynolds)

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Gollancz

Pages: 432

Release Date: September 15th 2016

Summary (from Goodreads):

The galaxy has seen great empires rise and fall. Planets have shattered and been remade. Amongst the ruins of alien civilizations, building our own from the rubble, humanity still thrives.

And there are vast fortunes to be made, if you know where to find them.

Captain Rackamore and his crew do. It’s their business to find the tiny, enigmatic worlds which have been hidden away, booby-trapped, surrounded by layers of protection–and to crack them open for the ancient relics and barely-remembered technologies inside. But while they ply their risky trade with integrity, not everyone is so scrupulous.

Adrana and Fura Ness are the newest members of Rackamore’s crew, signed on to save their family from bankruptcy. Only Rackamore has enemies, and there might be more waiting for them in space than adventure and fortune: the fabled and feared Bosa Sennen in particular.

Revenger is a science fiction adventure story set in the rubble of our solar system in the dark, distant future–a tale of space pirates, buried treasure, and phantom weapons, of unspeakable hazards and single-minded heroism and of vengeance…

Review:

I’ve been struggling with reading a bit the last few weeks so this took me longer to get into than usual, and I wasn’t sure about it at first. I’ve decided to put that down to personal struggles rather than the fault of the book, because towards the end I was hooked and raced to the finish.

Fura and her sister Adrana sign on to work as Bone Readers on a ship crewed by Captain Rackamore. They want to work to save their family from bankruptcy but space has other plans for them: Baubles, prickly ship mates and the infamous Bosa Sennen.

I loved that this book was about sisters rather than romance. I’m so sick of unrelateable romance stories. As someone with three sisters, this is the kind of relationship I want to read about, and I’m sure I can’t be the only one.

I struggled to get into the story at first and I think part of it was the language. The crew use slang words that it took me a while to get used to. While this all helped with the world building and the space setting, sometimes I just wasn’t sure what they were talking about, and it wasn’t until quite far into the book that I really felt I understood it all. It also moved very quickly from ships to land to ship, introducing lots of new characters with complicated names and then abandoning half of them for various reasons (no spoilers!) It made it hard to keep up sometimes.

Our narrator, Fura, undergoes a huge change over the course of the book, as characters often do, but I felt hers leapt suddenly without warning: one moment she was a naive girl with no idea what she was doing aboard a ship, and the next she was this hardened space veteran, and I felt the change was too sudden for me. On the other hand, it’s good to see events affecting a character, as it does irk me when they go through terrible things and act like nothing has happened.

I was intrigued by the mystery of the quoins and aliens looking after the banks, but have to say I was disappointed by the revelation: although it helped explain a certain characters motivation, the whole thing seemed rushed and just didn’t have much of an impact on me.

My favourite thing about the book was definitely the villain. Bosa Sennen is one creepy villain with a mysterious history that causes one character to kill himself at the sight of her. I’d love to read more of her space adventures as her back story really intrigued me.

Despite some difficulties getting into the book, I really enjoyed it overall and it’s made me want to read more sci-fi/re-watch Battlestar Galactica (again!)

4

Lost and Found Blog Tour: More of Me by Kathryn Evans

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Usbourne Publishing

Pages: 336

Release Date: February 1st 2016

Summary:

Teva’s life seems normal: school, friends, boyfriend. But at home she hides an impossible secret. Eleven other Tevas.

Because once a year, Teva separates into two, leaving a younger version of herself stuck at the same age, in the same house… watching the new Teva live the life that she’d been living. But as her seventeenth birthday rolls around, Teva is determined not to let it happen again. She’s going to fight for her future. Even if that means fighting herself.

Review:

I read the blurb of this book and thought it sounded fantastic, and just a few days later Chelley from Tales of Yesterday got in touch to ask if I’d like to review it for the Lost and Found Blog Tour – I think it was fate! Big thanks to her for arranging a copy for me, as well as this whole tour.

More of Me follows the story of Teva, or rather, the 16 year old version of Teva, as every birthday she splits in two and leaves her younger self left at home while she lives the next year of her life. 16 year old Teva is desperate to keep living her life, but as her 17th birthday approaches and she feels something stirring inside her, she gets more and more desperate.

I was really blown away with this book. It had me hooked from the very beginning and I raced through it, desperate to unravel its mysteries and see if this Teva could really stop the cycle. No spoilers here so you’ll have to read it to find out 😉

I really connected with Teva’s desperation to remain herself. The idea of not having a future, of not being able to make any plans beyond a year of your life is depressing, but at that age is seems doubly bad. Being 16 is all about planning for the future: passing your A levels, choosing a university or apprenticeship or career. Imagine being surrounded by all that and having to play along but knowing that soon you’ll be stuck inside a house with all your younger selves. The image of all these different stages of Teva like ghosts around the house is really haunting.

Part of me thought the Tevas should have more sympathy for each other, but it’s the tension between Teva and Fifteen that really drives a lot of the story. I suppose, even though you know it’s inevitable, you can’t help but resent the person who’s going to take over your life. I did feel for Fifteen though, who lost her boyfriend as well as her freedom, and the new Teva couldn’t keep up that same relationship, proving they weren’t exactly the same person each time.

Although this is a sci-fi/fantasy, there’s plenty of issues that teens can relate to in real life too – Teva’s itchy, scaly skin (I feel her there, having suffered eczema on and off myself) boyfriend jealousies, feelings for a new boy and lots of identity issues

I’ve already started recommending this to people. It’s an outstanding debut and I can’t wait to see what Kathryn writes next.

Copy of an art exhibit

About the Author

61rmlhdm4ql-_ux250_

From a back ground in theatre, Kathryn somehow ended up running a fruit farm and raising two children. In addition to writing, Kathryn loves to belly dance, fences competitively and is Finance Co-ordinator for SCBWI British Isles. It took Kathryn fifteen years to get published, her mum says if she were a dog, she’d be a terrier, a hound of tenacity.

Website: https://mrsbung.wordpress.com/

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mrsbung

About The Lost and Found Tour

What?

5 YA SCBWI debut authors get together for a UK tour.

Who?

Olivia Levez (The Island), Patrice Lawrence (Orangeboy), Kathryn Evans (More of Me), Sue Wallman (Lying About Last Summer), Eugene Lambert (The Sign of One)

Where?

Birmingham Waterstones for the launch event chaired by Chelley Toy!

When?

Saturday, 1st October, 2-4pm

Join us for a discussion of identity, loss, and the darkness inside; of self-discovery, friendship, and hope for a better tomorrow as part of the #LostandFound Book Tour.

Unflinching, clever and honest, our five authors explore what it means to grow up when the cards seem to be constantly stacked against you.

Don’t miss your chance to meet these amazing authors, ask questions, and get your books signed.

Book your tickets here:

https://www.waterstones.com/events/lostandfound-with-kathryn-evans-eugene-lambert-patrice-lawrence-olivia-levez-and-sue-wallman/birmingham

When? Where?
Sat 1st Oct, 2pm Birmingham Waterstones
Thurs 6th Oct, 6pm London Islington Waterstones
Sat 26th Nov Guildford Waterstones
Thurs 1st Dec Liverpool Writeblend
Sunday 22nd January Hampshire Libraries, Petersfield
Sat 4th March Glasgow Waterstones

Blog Tour

Follow the #LostAndFound for fab blog posts and reviews from 12th September – 30th September with some awesome bloggers!

lost-verticalMonday 12th September

Howling Reviews

Wednesday 14th September

YA Under My Skin

Friday 16th September

Tales of Yesterday

Sunday 18th September

The Book Magnet

Tuesday 20th September

The Pewter Wolf

Thursday 22nd September

Bart’s Bookshelf

Saturday 24th September

Dani Reviews Things

Monday 26th September

Chouett

Wednesday 28th September

The Mile Long Bookshelf

Friday 30th September

Maia and a Little Moore

 

 

 

Tommy V Cancer Blog Tour Review: Doctor Who, Shroud of Sorrow

17162397

Publisher: Broadway Books

Pages: 256

Release Date: April 2nd 2013

Summary (from Goodreads):

It is the day after John F. Kennedy’s assassination and the faces of the dead are everywhere. PC Reg Cranfield sees his recently deceased father in the mists along Totter’s Lane. Reporter Mae Callon sees her late grandmother in a coffee stain on her desk. FBI Special Agent Warren Skeet finds his long-dead partner staring back at him from raindrops on a window pane. Then the faces begin to talk, and scream… and push through into our world. As the alien Shroud begins to feast on the grief of a world in mourning, can the Doctor dig deep enough into his own sorrow to save mankind?

Review:

I am reviewing this book as part of the Tommy V Cancer blog tour, which you can read more about here. When I signed up to take part, there were quite a few books that caught my eye, but I settled on this one for my review (and bought a couple more for later!) I’ve not read a Doctor Who book before, though I do have Time Lord Fairy Tales sat on my TBR.

On his website, Tommy says he’s a huge fan of Doctor Who, and this is really apparent in his writing. While you might think it’s easy to write about an established character – in this case the Doctor as played by Matt Smith – as the reader already knows what they look and sound like, I think it’s a lot harder. There’s an expectation to live up to and unlike a character that has only been written about, everyone has a similar if not identical idea of a TV character.

Donbavand captures the essence of the Eleventh Doctor perfectly. I could picture Matt Smith saying the lines and it all sounded like just the kind of weird and wonderful things he’d say. He got Clara spot on as well, and I could tell because I disliked her in the book as much as I do in the TV show – something about her just irritates me!

The story itself is a really interesting one, as the Earth is invaded by the Shroud, an alien that feeds on grief. It took a lot of twists and turns. Each time I thought they’d solved it and I knew where it was going, something new would crop up and leave me wondering again. It did get a little ridiculous towards the end, but it was all good fun and I loved the way everything came together.

This is definitely one for the hardcore Doctor Who fans. There’s a wonderful moment with flashbacks of the Doctors past, and as someone who’s only watched the modern episodes (Ninth Doctor onwards) I didn’t know who all of them were, but there was an Amy Pond moment that gave me all the feels. I’m told it’s full of references and I know I probably only understand half of them, but those I got I really enjoyed.

As my first time reading a Doctor Who book, I think I picked a great one, and I’d definitely be interested in picking some more up now. I’d love to see another from Tommy Donbavand too, as his passion for the character really shines through in the writing.

4

About the Author

Tommy

Tommy is the author of the popular 13-book Scream Street series for 7 to 10 year olds, published by Walker Books in the UK and Candlewick Press in the US. His other books include Zombie!, Wolf and Uniform (winner of the Hackney Short Novel Award) for Barrington Stoke, Boredom Busters and Quick Fixes For Kids’ Parties (How To Books), and Making A Drama Out Of A Crisis (Network Continuum).

In theatre, Tommy’s plays have been performed to thousands of children on national tours to venues such as The Hackney Empire, Leeds City Varieties, and Nottingham Playhouse. These productions include Hey Diddle Diddle, Rumplestiltskin, Jack & Jill In The Forgotten Nursery, and Humpty Dumpty And The Incredibly Daring Rescue Of The Alien Princess From Deep Space. He is also responsible for five episodes of the CBBC TV series, Planet Cook (Platinum Films).

As an actor, Tommy played the Clearlake MC in the West End musical Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story for over eight years, in addition to roles in the movies Zombie Love Stories (where he battled hordes of Scottish undead) and Going Off Big Time (where he was beaten up on a bouncy castle). A veteran of pantomime, he has portrayed just about every comic character from Abanazer to an Ugly Sister.

Tommy lives in Lancashire with his wife and two sons. He is a HUGE fan of all things Doctor Who, plays blues harmonica, and makes a mean balloon poodle. He sees sleep as a waste of good writing time.

Website: http://www.tommydonbavand.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tommydonbavand

This blog tour is to help promote Tommy’s work and raise donations while he battles cancer. If you would like to donate then you can do so via Paypal here or you can sign up to become a Patron and pledge an amount each month to receive exclusive written content from Tommy. You can also buy his books – preferably from an independent bookshop, but if you want to order from Amazon then you can use this affiliate link to earn him a bit more from each purchase.

Twitter Chat
To end the tour, Vivienne (@Serendipity_Viv) and Chelle (@ChelleyToy) will be hosting a twitter chat.
This will be on 30th June 2016, 8 – 9pm
The hashtag for the chat is #tommyvcancer
Please join us!

Follow the Tour!

Tommy Tour 4

Book Review: The Fire Sermon (Francesca Haig)

Publisher: HarperVoyager

Pages: 432

Release Date: July 30th 2015

Summary (from Goodreads):

What would you do if you had to leave everything you knew behind?

If what made you perfect also made you an outcast?

If your twin, once your only friend, was now your worst enemy?
Since the blast that reshaped the earth, only twins are born. The imperfect one of each pair is branded at birth and sent away. Twins share nothing but the moment of their death: when one dies, so does the other. But Cass and her twin Zach cannot be separated.

In this scorched and broken world, Cass’s bond with her brother may be the most dangerous thing of all.

Review:

Despite this taking forever to read (think I had a little bit of a reading slump) I really enjoyed this book.

The idea of everyone being born with a twin, one Alpha and one Omega, destined to die at the same time, was really fascinating. I liked the idea of twins being used against each other politically: it’s such a powerful bargaining chip.

The book started off a bit slow for me: it felt like there was a lot of back story and info-dumping and I just wanted to skip ahead a bit and get to the real action. But once it got going it was great. I loved Cass’ view on the twins situation, and it didn’t feel too unbelievable either. Her’s and Zach’s upbringing together, rather than separated, gave that strong bond between them which influenced her feelings towards twins, instead of her just being ‘special’ etc. And until she pointed out that when fighting Alphas, Omegas were dying somewhere too, I hadn’t even thought of that.

I called the plot twist a little before it happened, but it kept me guessing for most of the book so I can’t complain. The climax was still surprising, although I felt it was a little bit dragged out and could have ended with a bit more of a bang.

The pacing of the book felt a bit off – everything was just a bit slow, and there was so much travelling it sometimes all blurred together. It made it a struggle to read sometimes: once I did it was great, but the idea of going back to it wasn’t always appealing, which was a shame. It’s made me struggle with what rating to give it: I started off on 4 as it was really interesting, but I’ve knocked a star off for not gripping me enough. Still, I’m looking forward to the sequel and hope that captures me more.

3

Book Review: Saga Deluxe Edition Volume 1 (Brian K. Vaughan, Fiona Staples)

Publisher: Image Comics

Pages: 504

Release Date: November 25th 2014

Summary (from Goodreads):

Saga is the story of Hazel, a child born to star-crossed parents from opposite sides of a never-ending galactic war. Now, Hazel’s fugitive family must risk everything to find a peaceful future in a harsh universe that values destruction over creation.

Review:

I’m not even sure where to begin with this review.

I got Saga as a present from Nathan for Christmas 2014, so it’s taken me a while to get round to it. I’m not sure why really, except it’s a big book so wasn’t really one I could take on my travels. I’m kind of glad I put it off now though, as there’s some bits I relate to more now and probably enjoyed more because of that.

I’ve started reading more graphic novels lately, but I always have this secret fear that I’m not reading them right. I read them as I read books: quickly, not because I’m rushing, it’s just how I’ve always read. I worry with graphic novels that I’m not giving the pictures enough attention. And sometimes that shows I think, as I get confused with what’s going on.

This wasn’t the case with Saga though. I knew exactly what was going on, and immediately felt comfortable in the world. That’s a pretty huge compliment, as it’s a massive and complex world, and to be able to feel immersed in it completely from the first issue is really impressive. The world is rich with history – all hinted at, subtly bringing it together rather than one big info-dump – and is spread across several different planets, each with distinct visuals and creatures to match.

Then there are the characters. Man, I just loved them all. I was even rooting for the villains, which shows how well rounded they all are.

The main story is following Hazel, a new born baby who’s parents are different species, on opposite sides of a long standing war. Her parents, Alana and Marko are on the run from both of their own kinds as they try to stay out of the war and keep themselves and Hazel alive.

I loved Alana – she was crass and funny and just my kind of girl. Add to that her being a new mother, like me, and I just related to her completely. Some of her comments, from the first page where she’s giving birth, really resounded me.

Accompanying them are Marko’s parents and the ghost of half a sassy teenage girl who is bound to Hazel and becomes her night time sitter, as well as an essential part of the group as she helps them out of many scrapes with her resourcefulness and powerful illusions.

Then we have their pursuers.

My least favourite was Prince Robot IV. There’s nothing wrong with him and I found him and his story interesting, but just not as much as the others. Someone’s got to come last anyway.

Then we have The Will and The Stalk, two rival Freelancers who have both been hired to assassinate Marko and Alana and capture Hazel alive. The Stalk is some kind of spider alien and looks incredible. The Will is accompanied by Lying Cat, a beautiful cat who says when people are lying, and was probably one of my favourite characters. They’re soon joined by Gwendolyn, a woman with a vendetta against Marko, and Sophie, a six year old slave girl he rescues. While I felt like these were some of the villains of the story, seeing as they’d been hired to kill our protagonists, but I loved them all still.

So much happens in this book, and I just adored it all. There’s a wealth of interesting creatures and exciting encounters with them, and the war story just sings to me. I don’t think I can put across how much I enjoyed this in words, so I’d just encourage you to read it. Now.

Copy of an art exhibit

Book Review: Paper Girls Volume 1 (Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang, Matthew Wilson)

* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *

Publisher: Image Comics

Pages: 144

Release Date: April 5th 2016

Summary (from Goodreads):

In the early hours after Halloween of 1988, four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls uncover the most important story of all time. Suburban drama and otherworldly mysteries collide in this smash-hit series about nostalgia, first jobs, and the last days of childhood.

Review:

I’m currently reading (and loving) Saga, also by Brian K. Vaughan, so when I saw this on NetGalley I had to go for it.

While this didn’t grip me as much as Saga has, I still enjoyed it. I love the all female leads: four paper girls from the 80s with bundles of attitude and sass. It’s great to see a lady-led cast and they all had different personalities and brought their own humour and badass-ness to the story.

I love a bit of sci-fi and this one intrigued me. I understood enough to enjoy the story, but there was enough mystery to leave me wanting more. The plot moves very quick from one thing to another: this is a plus because you’re never bored, but I found it sometimes left me a little confused. There were a few times when I didn’t quite get what was going on from the drawings and only caught up when someone said it in the dialogue. Still, the art style is really beautiful, and the colour scheme really screams 80s at me, which I loved.

There’s one hell of a cliffhanger at the end, which really sets up where the story is going to go and leaves you gagging for more – I know I’ll certainly be on the lookout for the next issue.

4